Learning his Options

Published on
February 25th, 2019
Duration
14 minutes


Learning his Options

How I Got My Start in Finance ·
Featuring Steve Diggle

Published on: February 25th, 2019 • Duration: 14 minutes

Options exchanges in the 1980s allowed many, including Steve Diggle, to establish themselves as derivatives experts early in their careers. Buying the first call option on the Hong Kong Options Exchange set Steve Diggle on the path to banking a billion dollars on a single trade. This clip is excerpted from a video published on Real Vision on March 12, 2018.

Comments

  • PC
    Peter C.
    27 February 2019 @ 16:27
    can't find the original indicated in 2018. RV is this from the master class in 2 parts aired way back? can I please get a link? thank you great work.
  • JS
    John S.
    27 February 2019 @ 09:58
    Enjoyed re-watching this. Need to go back to the full discussion again. Good stuff!
  • Nv
    Nick v.
    27 February 2019 @ 09:30
    I learnt very little from this and yet know that there is a lot I can learn from Steve Diggle. Should have been longer + include 3 career lessons
  • SD
    Stephen D. | Contributor
    27 February 2019 @ 04:21
    I just rewatched this from years ago, the very dawn of RV.! The point I was laboriously trying to make is this: If you are a young and ambitious person and keen to advance in the world quickly you need to find new fields where your lack of experience won't be a crippling disadvantage and your fearlessness might be an asset. Find a new industry or geography and become a niche specialist in areas where more established, senior people are either absent or afraid. The world of Blockchain has been cited as an example, and if you have the skills it's exactly the sort of place a young person can make a mark. If you go into Banking or Consultancy today you may have a good salary and great training but you are looking at many years slowly moving up the ladder. I got lucky in the options world in Asia arriving at the very start of a long expansion.
    • MR
      Mark R.
      27 February 2019 @ 18:46
      Hi Steve, totally agree with your points of specification however when young, 'hungry' and without 'experience' sometimes its better to stay generalist to see the wider landscape of industry before drilling down/biting the specialised bullet. wish i had specialised more: multi asset this or macro/generalist trader that implies Jack of all , master of little! The Financial industry is all encompassing and certainly takes a few years to get a feel for something you may or may not be good at. Sometimes you might be lucky enough to time your introduction within an industry to coincide with a recession/regulation/event to purge the older guys and let the young shoots grow - but in my experience this is very difficult and old guys getting paid 2007 wages tend to sick like glue! heyho! no-fun no-money but mastered the art of the brew! thanks & keep up contributions , looking forward to next road trip! to Venezuela ?
    • NF
      Nicholas F.
      1 March 2019 @ 08:44
      Steve, great insight. enjoyed re-watching this segment. Have heard many stories of the "old wall st days" time and time again on the desk that ring true to your statements. My passion for learning and curiosity have been a major reason why I've stayed in finance after the tales from friends and family about getting into other industries ect...thank you for the thoughtful and practical words, helpful as i've been feeling stuck for awhile but watching and listening to thoughtful fund managers such as yourself on RVs platform really encourages me to keep being creative in what products i trade and to never stop learning or fear diving into something new.