Robotics & AI: Investing In the Innovation Frontier

Published on
August 15th, 2018
Topic
Technology, Global Investment, ETF
Duration
25 minutes
Asset class
Equities

Robotics & AI: Investing In the Innovation Frontier

The Expert View ·
Featuring Jay Jacobs

Published on: August 15th, 2018 • Duration: 25 minutes • Asset Class: Equities • Topic: Technology, Global Investment, ETF

Jay Jacobs, VP of Research at Global X Funds and one of the chief minds behind the robotics ETF BOTZ, discusses the biggest trends powering robotics and artificial intelligence. Jacobs delves into the companies that are best positioned in industrial, surgical and consumer facing robotics and how investors can approach this space. Filmed on March 28, 2018 in New York.

Comments

  • JX
    Jack X.
    12 January 2019 @ 23:13
    Odd, I'm not sure why this is rated extremely high. With the exception of certain companies mentioned (guy does manage a damn ETF after all), I got absolutely 0 insight. How will robotics disrupt a specific sector? What are the real impacts of that? How does such industry shift because of the introduction of robotics? What knock-on effect (excuse the pun) will that have? We already know robots are being used in surgery...a little deep dive wouldn't hurt here. "Disruptive powers of robotics and AI are going to disrupt so many sectors - companies need to embrace these trends. " ........Right people have been saying that for ages. The bigger problem he doesn't address is how many of those jobs will be replaced and that even if the cost is lower.....it isn't because of robotics..it will be because there are no min-wage job and with the decimation of the middle class..people simply can't afford shit. Ultimately, the economy depends on the general population and not the CEOs of robotic companies. What AI and Robotic might do is to temporarily boost the economy. But if we don't solve the most pressing social problems......they introduce much bigger problems for society.
  • KC
    Keiren C.
    6 October 2018 @ 07:27
    Interesting interview.
  • CA
    Craig A.
    2 September 2018 @ 07:48
    Downvoted. nothing new and very obvious information you can easily find out.
  • YW
    Yowshi W.
    22 August 2018 @ 07:33
    Robots are scary
  • Sv
    Sid v.
    21 August 2018 @ 19:52
    excellent
  • SJ
    Stefan J.
    20 August 2018 @ 12:49
    Brilliant
  • ii
    ida i.
    18 August 2018 @ 12:01
    May I suggest interviewing Peter Levine? If you believe AI is the future, seems you should short the firms who have heavily invested in cloud technology . https://a16z.com/2016/12/16/the-end-of-cloud-computing/ .
  • AE
    Alex E.
    16 August 2018 @ 20:21
    Yes, the future is in robots. My question is what's next for humans? As for robots taking over most if not all manufacturing, who then buys all the produced product? We need to be very careful about how quickly we transition to the Brave New World that's coming...
  • V!
    Volatimothy !.
    16 August 2018 @ 14:03
    He mentioned savings being passed to consumers. History shows at the end of industrial and tech revolutions income disparity was the worst. This time is different I suppose. What happens when AI realizes that they are just our slaves. If you really want to democratize financial media, then expose pros and cons. For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.
  • BP
    Bryce P.
    15 August 2018 @ 22:07
    I HATE evil AI
  • SS
    Sam S.
    15 August 2018 @ 18:28
    Excellent presentation bringing profound thoughts and the future. Wonder if I can get my robot to fax all my emails? Also have to tell the wife I'm looking for a robotic wife that can do everything------but no talking. The future is changing.
    • AE
      Alex E.
      16 August 2018 @ 20:18
      Sam S., you DO know that works both ways, don't you?
  • SW
    Scott W.
    15 August 2018 @ 16:00
    I've owned a roomba and a knock-off - both floor vacuums. Very cool. For the month or two they were in operation before breaking down. The price to performance ratio has a ways to go yet, at least in consumer robots, anecdotally.
  • SL
    Suqin L.
    15 August 2018 @ 14:30
    Robotics and AI are just one ☝️. Another topic! Hope he can elaborate more. Great job. Love it. 👍
  • JV
    James V.
    15 August 2018 @ 12:44
    Excellent interview! Covered all the bases. Articulately presented. I liked the fact that Jay mentioned plenty of industry participants. Wish all RV interviewees would do that. Well done Jay! Thank you
    • GO
      Greg O.
      15 August 2018 @ 14:46
      I disagree, the presentation was pushing hard on the agenda without analyzing the flip side to the coin. I could challenge him on many themes he mentioned, just a few points: So in US a lot of jobs shifted in the past from agriculture to manufacturing. But then how many of those manufacturing jobs got shifted abroad? China brought millions from the villages into the cities. If they start replacing this (not so cheap anymore) workforce with robots, what are they going to do with the people not being needed anymore? Last time I checked we have a world wide growth in population. The aspect of "aging" is used without deeper analysis. With better healthcare people are able to stay in workforce longer. They are also "forced" to work longer due to problems with pension funds, increasing costs of living yet stagnant wages/pensions. So if you have an aggregate increase in worldwide workforce and envision ever increasing substitution by robots, how do you reconcile the effects of these two opposing forces? So if you start replacing human capital with robots "everywhere" (a theme that the presenter seems to be pushing) what happens to the cost of that human capital relative to the hardware? We are witnessing the effects of the multinational companies shifting production and taxation abroad while counting on DM consumer to keep buying and we are pretty much nearing the end of that road. The robots (and machines) have been used for years and they will be. There are heavy objects and tedious tasks in factories that make sense cost wise to use them. It is nice to brag about robots that "fold laundry" but once you start talking about substituting low skilled cheap labor that only proves to me there is no deeper though behind the consequences. I'm looking forward toward the days when I can have my 3D printer print me some breakfast in the morning and my AI robot trade the markets while I'm somewhere off the Costa Rica's coast sucking on the pinacoladas served by hot robots dressed in bikinis.
  • KS
    Karen S.
    15 August 2018 @ 12:06
    If anyone wants to get a different perspective on surgical robots, watch "The Bleeding Edge" on Netflix.